Last edited by Zulkit
Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of Old English place-names and field-names containing lēah found in the catalog.

Old English place-names and field-names containing lēah

Christer Johansson

Old English place-names and field-names containing lēah

by Christer Johansson

  • 189 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Almqvist & Wiksell international in Stockholm .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Names, Geographical -- Great Britain.,
  • English language -- Etymology -- Names.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Christer Johansson.
    SeriesStockholm studies in English -- 32, Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDA645
    The Physical Object
    Pagination170 p. ;
    Number of Pages170
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19005932M

    Page 26 of the ultimate A-Z Old English names list, complete with name meanings and origins for all Old English baby names. Showing names from "Winton" to "Æscwine". Check it out! this book is a dictionary of english place names. the dictionary embraces names of the country, of the counties, and other important divisions (as craven, kesteven, lindsey), towns (except those of late origin) parishes, villages, some names of estates and hamlets, or even farms whose names are old and etymologically interesting, rivers, lakes - also name of capes, hills,/5(18).

    In Old English, spoken before the seventh century, ‘leah’ meant wood and ‘rod’ meant clearing. Probably the first written record of the name is to be found in the Poll Tax returns for the West Riding of when Alicia Legh-rode was required to hand over money to the King. green = names or words in Old English (OE), Old High German (OHG) and Old Norse (ON) or cognate terms; purple = Modern German, Dutch or Scandinavian names or words * Note: This article is only intended to be a general survey of many of the more prominent place-names containing theophoric or supranormal elements, and is intended to spur the.

    The Book of English Place Names: How Our Towns and Villages Got Their Names Kindle Edition by Caroline Taggart (Author) › Visit Amazon's Caroline Taggart Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Are you an author? Reviews: HARLEY: English surname transferred to forename use, composed of the Old English elements hær "rock" and leah "meadow, pasture," hence "rocky meadow." HARLIN: English surname transferred to forename use, from the Norman French personal name Herluin, meaning "noble friend" or .


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Old English place-names and field-names containing lēah by Christer Johansson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Old English place-names and field-names containing lēah. Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell international, (OCoLC) Material Type: Thesis/dissertation: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Christer Johansson. the Old English leah. This is a word that in early Anglo Saxon times meant ‘wood’.

There has been some Old English place-names and field-names containing leah, (Stockholm: Almqvist & Wiksell International, ); Della Hooke “The woodland in the Domesday Book, and later in. Means "Hugh's town", from the given name HUGH and Old English tun meaning "enclosure, town".

This is the name of a town in Scotland. The American city of Houston is named after the Texas president Sam Houston (), whose surname is derived from the Scottish town. Ekwall's outstanding position in the field of English place-names is universally recognized, and his Dictionary is the standard reference book for all interested in the meanings of the names of our cities, towns, villages and hamlets.

“Another volume for every local historian's bookshelf” - Local HistorianThis revised edition of the Dictionary of British Place-Names includes o engaging and informative entries, tracing the development of the featured place-names from earliest times to the present day. Included place-names range from the familiar to the obscure, among them 'Beer', 'Findlater', 'Broadbottom', and.

Chester is from an Old English word for a Roman town, Thorpe from an Old Norse word for an outlying Old English place-names and field-names containing lēah book, and Wick from an Old English word for a specialised farm. Like these, some place-names contain a single word (or ‘element’).

Carole Hough introduces the study of place-names and suggests how readers can get involved in some. THE ORIGIN OF SOME ENGLISH PLACE NAMES. By Tim Lambert. BURY, BOROUGH. This is usually a corruption of burh, which meant a fort of fortified place. Aylesbury was Aegel's burh or burgh. Boarhunt was burh funta the spring by the fort.

Narborough in Leicestershire was nor (north) burh. By was the Danish word for village. Derby was Deor By the. GLOSSARY OF SELECTED FIELD NAMES Presented sheet by sheet and identified by field number. Field names based on unrecognised personal names have been omitted.

There are references to three books (with page numbers), two by the appropriately named John Field: FD= John Field, English Field Names: A Dictionary, Alan Sutton, File Size: 50KB. This article lists a number of common generic forms in place names in the British Isles, their meanings and some examples of their use.

The study of place names is called toponymy ; for a more detailed examination of this subject in relation to British and Irish place names, refer to Toponymy in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Audio Books & Poetry Community Audio Computers, Technology and Science Music, Arts & Culture News & Public Affairs Non-English Audio Spirituality & Religion Librivox Free Audiobook Joseph Edward Zalewski Brenda Trupp's Podcast Chris Hawkes Drevilcrazyguy shares evilnews Ecrit et cultures dans l'Europe moderne AlCaponis 10x Ambassadors Experience.

The etymologies of these names are all discussed below. It may be remarked that Baynhurst, Faircross, Ganfield, Hormer, Ock, and Ripplesmere are not now place-names.

The Charlton near Wantage has nothing to do with the hundred, though its origin is the same. Ock is really the name of a river ; called in A.S. Eocca. From Old English bucc "buck, male deer" and leah "woodland, clearing".

This is the name of a few minor towns in England. This is the name of a few minor towns in England. BUDAPEST (Settlement) Hungarian, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish. Often the names just meant ‘river’ or ‘water’, and sometimes no one knows what they originally meant; in the Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names, AD Mills calls Severn “an ancient.

History. Historically part of Lancashire, the name Leece is probably from the Old English leah, which means 'woodland clearing', and the plural of which is was recorded in the Domesday Book as Lies, in the Manor of Hougun held by Earl Tostig.

It appears later in as Lees. Leece used to contain the United Methodist Free was founded inbut closed in Civil parish: Aldingham. History of English Place-Names: Articles > Names. A Survey of the History of English Place­names. By Scolastica la souriete. The subject of English place­names is a complicated one.

There are many factors involved, not the least of which is the waves of conquest England suffered during the period in which most of her place­names were formed.

From an English surname that was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah. Until the s it was more commonly given to boys in the United States, but it is now most often used on girls. Synonyms, crossword answers and other related words for BOOK OF PLACE NAMES [gazetteer] We hope that the following list of synonyms for the word gazetteer will help you to finish your crossword today.

We've arranged the synonyms in length order so that they are easier to find. The Book of English Place Names: How Our Towns and Villages Got Their Names [Taggart, Caroline] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Book of English Place Names: How Our Towns and Villages Got Their Names/5(63).

Field Name Books of Limerick Field Name Books of the County and City of Limerick with the Place-Names, English and Irish as explained and fixed by John O'Donovan. Ordnance Survey of Ireland with the addition of The Ordnance Survey Letters for Co. Limerick.

Presented on a parish by parish basis, alphabetically and with inter-active maps. Old English From the middle of the 5th century the Angles, Saxons and Jutes invaded the British Isles. They were all Germanic tribes ad their language formed the base of the English language.

Thus, the place names that contain Anglo-Saxon elements are numerous. Here are a few. A large addition to these place-names came from the wave of Vikings (Danes and Norwegians) that arrived in the early 10th century.

Their language of Old Norse was similar and related in some ways to Old English and had a massive influence - approximately two thirds of .Old English place-names and field-names containing leah, Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis: Stockholm Studies in English XXXII.

KER, N.R. Catalogue of manuscripts containing Author: Peter Kitson.Page - Coal was brought to the mouth of the tunnel in mine cars, dumped into a skip, and hoisted up over the bluff by a square framed derrick which spilled into a railroad car standing on the spur.

At the west end of the railroad a vertical three-compartment shaft was sunk over 25 feet and a tunnel was started on coal in the sea bluff to connect with the shaft.